How to deal with Ear Mites in Cats in Knoxville?

How to deal with Ear Mites in Cats in Knoxville?

Do you see your cat rubbing its ears or shaking its head? It may be mites, a natural parasite that lives on their skin's surface. Here's how to see if your cat has ear mites so you can cure them and keep them from spreading.

WHAT ARE MITES?

Cats' ears may be scratched for a variety of reasons. When scratching becomes a concern rather than just a nuisance, ear mites may be to blame. Mites are tiny parasites that spend most of their lives within the ear canal and can cause extreme ear inflammation and itchiness. Otodectes cynotis is the most common kind of ear mite in cats. These are barely visible to the naked eye, but they can be identified as very tiny white dots. Ear mites feed on ear wax and skin oils and live on the skin of the ear canal.

While ear mites are most often present in the ears, they can also spread to the rest of the body, causing skin irritation and itchiness. Since these parasites may be difficult to detect and may not be the only source of ear infection or injury in cats, it is better to have your pet examined by a veterinarian for a clinical evaluation.

WHAT CAUSES MITES IN CATS?

Ear mites can be picked up nearly everywhere, including from other cats. Contact with other pet-carrying mites provides the ideal chance for mites to swap hosts and pass into the cat's hair. They creep their way to the ears from there.

Ear mites can also survive in the environment for a brief period of time, during which time they can infect any cat that passes by. This is why outdoor cats are at a greater risk of contracting this parasitic infection.

SIGNS YOUR CAT MAY HAVE MITES 

Ear mites are easy to identify depending on your pet's actions and appearance. The mites themselves, on the other hand, are usually too small to be seen by the naked eye. The following are the most common symptoms of ear mites in cats:

  • Repetitive head-scratching or rubbing of the ears.
  • Ears that are red and inflamed.
  • Ear discharge that is dark, waxy, or crusty.
  • Other areas of the body are irritated, resulting in an excessive level of scratching.
ARE MITES CONTAGIOUS TO OTHER PETS?

Yes, mites are infectious to other cats; even though other pets do not exhibit signs of mites, they must be handled at the same time. Due to their lifestyle, cats are the most susceptible to contracting ear mites.

TREATMENT AND PREVENTION

There are many medication options for ear mites, and your veterinarian in Knoxville will recommend the right one for your pet. It is critical to keep your cat's indoor environment as clean as possible, particularly if they have previously been treated for mites.

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO GET RID OF MITES IN CATS?

A mite develops from an egg to an adult in only 3 weeks, passing through 5 stages in total, so you can wait at least as long for your cat to be free of the microscopic insects. Adults have a lifespan of only two months, but they can reproduce easily. Eggs hatch in four days and mature into an adult mite ready to reproduce in three weeks. The itchiness should begin to subside when the drug takes effect, but if your cat's symptoms do not change, you should call your veterinarian.

If you suspect your cat has ear mites contact us to make an appointment, we will help you get rid of these little parasites.